APEXX 8R Boosting Solidworks Visualize

The BOXX APEXX 8R featuring 8X Nvidia Quadro P6000 GPUs will be on display at GTC in San Jose at the BOXX booth #423.

Which scenario would you want in a collaborative design review or have access to throughout the design process? Be sure to watch the video above in full screen HD.

The 2016 release of Solidworks included a new visualization tool called Visualize which enables designers to quickly and easily generate marketing quality renderings. In 2017, Solidworks Visualize added additional functionality with the announcement of PowerBoost. This feature allows the user to draw on the resources of a GPU accelerated network rendering server, or an Nvidia VCA, and stream the end result directly back to the end user’s viewport. Continue reading

Under the Hood

Specialization is For Insects

There are some things about BOXX I think you should know. I wouldn’t call them secrets, but in a way they are hidden. It’s not the kind of thing you get from a typical marketing email or blog post. I’m here to talk about the little stuff—the interesting details that come together to make every BOXX system what it is. And, as it happens, one of those little details is me.

I’m an assembler at BOXX Technologies. I’ve been building systems here since 2012, I’ve seen the models come and go, and I’ve built them all. Updated, tweaked, revised or refreshed, each time they get better and better. Not just the technology, mind you, but the systems themselves. Alongside the rapidly-advancing motherboards, processors, RAM, and video cards are chassis designed by BOXX engineers right here in Austin, Texas. In an industry that changes so rapidly, you must be able to adjust as quickly. If you can adjust even more quickly, even better.

But it isn’t just about keeping up with technology. It’s also about being the only hardware company offering specific solutions to specific problems—for example, the brand-new Pro VDI 8401R-V, which happens to be the world’s first overclocked system designed for VDI power users[1]. No longer will your VDI solution running CAD for multiple users feel graphically inadequate. Allow those ten cores running at up to 4.3 GHz to set you free. That’s the kind of thing I’d write if I were in marketing, anyway. Continue reading

SolidWorks 2017 comes with new tricks and new options

The latest SolidWorks has a little something for everybody, but mostly CEO Gian Paolo Bassi works hard to keep everyone happy.

bassi_sw17-300x225Dassault Systèmes rolled out the latest version of SolidWorks with a live stream and event for users, press, and analysts. Clued-in users were not surprised by much in the announcement, since SolidWorks has been walking their base through the changes to come for some time. In general CAD users hate big surprises.

But, whether they like it or not big waves of change have been transforming the CAD industry for the last five years. And, during times of change loyalties may shift. The users are up for grabs especially because CAD is becoming integrated into production and encompasses more functions than ever before. If the CAD model is to truly be the digital twin of the products it is describing, it has to have information about all aspects of the design.

SolidWorks claims more than 3.1 million users, which includes education. Dassault Systèmes is also claiming around 3 million registered users for its DraftSight drafting tool, which they now say is getting a user base of its own and not just as an alternative to AutoCAD.

As for SolidWorks itself, the company has, as always, focused on usability with more little tweaks to features like context-aware tool tips, improvements to breadcrumbs, and alerts for problems in the models that highlight the actual problem so users can go straight in and fix it. It has enhanced support for large assemblies, magnetic mates and improved tools for chamfers, fillets, and holes.


Read the Full Article at gfxspeak.com

The DEVELOP3D Review: BOXX APEXX 2 + BOXX renderPRO 2

Ray trace rendering is arguably the most computationally intensive process in any product development workflow. It is highly multi-threaded so it absolutely hammers all of a workstation’s CPU cores. It is also extremely scalable, so doubling the number of cores can, in many cases, halve the render time.

CAD software is very different in that it is a single threaded process, so the majority of tasks are performed on one CPU core. This means it thrives on a high frequency (GHz) CPU. Performance will not increase if you add more CPU cores.

This presents a big challenge when choosing a workstation for both CAD and rendering. The highest frequency CPUs have the least number of cores, while the ones with the most cores tend to have the lowest frequencies. As a result, designers and engineers must accept that there will always be a trade off. Or must they?

Custom workstation manufacturer BOXX offers an alternative solution by dedicating separate machines to each process. CAD work is done on the BOXX APEXX 2, a high frequency Intel Core i7 desktop workstation, while the rendering is handled by the BOXX renderPRO 2, a networked, dual Intel Xeon rendering machine with lots of cores.

As both machines work completely independently of each other, it also means that the BOXX APEXX 2 workstation will be able to dedicate almost all of its resources to CAD modelling when the BOXX renderPRO 2 is rendering.

In contrast, when a traditional desktop workstation is set to render flat out, it will often become sluggish, making it almost impossible to do any meaningful CAD work.

To get round this, users have to reduce the number of cores assigned to the rendering task, either by changing processor affinity in Windows Task manager (so specific applications use specific CPU cores) or by applying more granular control of CPU core usage inside the rendering application. And that means renders come back slower.

CLICK HERE to read the full article from DEVELOP3D!