Miroslav Dimitrov of Bentley Motors Reviews BOXX renderPRO

 

Many people make the wrong assumptions that all designers and creative people work on Mac computers – Totally Wrong! Despite their “Pro” name, MacBookPros and MacPros are just good looking consumer grade computers ideal for photographers, graphic designers and home enthusiasts. When it comes to demanding professional work however, we are talking about BOXX, Lenovo ThinkStation, HP Z series and DELL Precision series. Workstations like these are designed to be fast, very reliable and run under heavy loads for many hours, even days! BOXX needs little introduction to the creative professionals. They are computer specialist making some of the finest and fastest workstations for creative professionals.

What is renderPRO then? RenderPRO is a product made from BOXX computers designed to help the creative professionals doing a lot of 3D rendering while simultaneously working on their main workstation, in other words it’s a personal render farm/slave. If you’re familiar with certain BOXX products already you will find that the unit is cleverly designed to sits on top of your Apexx 4 or 5 workstation. It comes in the same black grained exterior colour to match your workstation too. It’s really good to look at and it feels solid! Unlike the mainstream computer vendors, all BOXX products feel solid and made with high quality and durable materials so no surprise here.

One thing to consider, this little beast is not meant to be used as a main workstation or stand alone computer, although it can be. The main purpose of this little but powerful unit is to sit on top of your workstation and render large 3D scenes while you’re working on your computer.

 

READ THE FULL REVIEW FROM MIROSLAV DIMITROV OF BENTLEY MOTORS

Can a Virtual Workstation truly provide an experience comparable to a traditional deskside machine?

Giving Boxx’s Pro VDI a test drive

Business executives and IT administrators alike have long been enamored with platform virtualization technology, and rightfully so. the advantages of hosting virtual desktops remotely in the data center are well-known and precisely the reason VDI — Virtual Deskstop Infrastructure (VDI), one but not the only example of hosted virtual desktops — has grown from nothing to a near $6 billion dollar business.

With the relatively recent advent of GPU-accelerated server-hosted virtual machines, businesses that rely on traditional workstations (deskside towers and mobile laptops) can finally join the virtual hosting opportunity. Many are in the process now of evaluating virtual workstation solutions to determine if they might replace or complement a business’s existing traditional workstation infrastructure.

But users don’t have the same interests and computing environments that executives and administrators do. Whereas the latter are concerned with security, cost, management and other business issues, the former’s concerns are only about doing their jobs effectively and efficently. And that means running their critical applications and workflow as effectively on a remotely hosted virtual machine as they’ve done it with traditional physical machines at their desk. If they can do that, great. But if they can’t, then all those promised benefits of virtualization are moot.

And that’s why we were intrigued to test a new product from Boxx Technologies, a server optimized to host virtual workstations to serve professional-caliber, graphics-intensive applications. Could it deliver a workstation experience comparable to traditional deskside machines?

 

 

Boxx aggressively exploring virtual workstation technology with multiple hardware options

A respected long-time vendor of high-performance workstations for CAD and Media/Entertainment applications, Boxx  has flourished in the face of Tier 1 workstation competition (i.e. HP, Dell and Lenovo) by pushing the envelope on technologies  and new computing approaches. On the latter front, the company is leaving no stone unturned in its attempt to be a  leader in the emerging arena of virtual workstations.

The company has introduced not one but two Boxx-branded server lines equipped with GPU accelerators and optimized  for virtual workstation hosting: Pro VDI and GRID. The GRID brand product delivers an official Nvidia GRID vGPU solution  running on Tesla GPU-based boards, while Pro VDI products a built on Quadro professional graphics boards. Why  both a GRID compliant and non-GRID product line? Well, the answer is two-fold. Some feel that dedicating a physical GPU  to a virtual machine (VM; i.e. vDGA) performs better than a VM with GRID vGPU running a dedicated (single-user) profile.

The second answer is likely the more important one: Nvidia GRID licensing. Running an official GRID solution on top  of Tesla M-series GPUs (and future GPUs, presumably) requires one of three GRID license options. The appropriate license  for professional applications is the Virtual Workstation license, and that’s substantially more expensive — expensive enough  for many to pass on GRID and stick with the existing vDGA solutions running on Quadro or AMD Radeon Pro boards.

 

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE FROM JON PEDDIE RESEARCH

SolidWorks 2017 comes with new tricks and new options

The latest SolidWorks has a little something for everybody, but mostly CEO Gian Paolo Bassi works hard to keep everyone happy.

bassi_sw17-300x225Dassault Systèmes rolled out the latest version of SolidWorks with a live stream and event for users, press, and analysts. Clued-in users were not surprised by much in the announcement, since SolidWorks has been walking their base through the changes to come for some time. In general CAD users hate big surprises.

But, whether they like it or not big waves of change have been transforming the CAD industry for the last five years. And, during times of change loyalties may shift. The users are up for grabs especially because CAD is becoming integrated into production and encompasses more functions than ever before. If the CAD model is to truly be the digital twin of the products it is describing, it has to have information about all aspects of the design.

SolidWorks claims more than 3.1 million users, which includes education. Dassault Systèmes is also claiming around 3 million registered users for its DraftSight drafting tool, which they now say is getting a user base of its own and not just as an alternative to AutoCAD.

As for SolidWorks itself, the company has, as always, focused on usability with more little tweaks to features like context-aware tool tips, improvements to breadcrumbs, and alerts for problems in the models that highlight the actual problem so users can go straight in and fix it. It has enhanced support for large assemblies, magnetic mates and improved tools for chamfers, fillets, and holes.


Read the Full Article at gfxspeak.com

Engineered with SOLIDWORKS for SOLIDWORKS Users

As a 3D CAD engineer or product designer, SOLIDWORKS enables you to transform ideas into new, innovative products. No one know understands this better than BOXX Technologies’ engineering team, the elite professionals who rely on the CAD application to design custom chassis for all of our APEXX workstations and one-of-a-kind renderBOXX and renderPRO dedicated rendering systems. These enclosures, manufactured in the USA, require precise design in order to accommodate features like overclocked or dual processors, liquid cooling, SSDs, multiple GPUs, and more.



CLICK HERE
to read the full article on The SolidWorks Blog from Dassault Systemes

 

AEC Magazine Review: BOXX APEXX 2 + renderPRO 2

By dedicating a high GHz workstation to CAD and a dual Xeon box to rendering, designers can have optimised hardware for both processes. The workflow benefits can be huge, but the package doesn’t come cheap, writes Greg Corke.

Ray trace rendering is arguably the most computationally intensive process in any architectural design workflow. It is highly multi-threaded so it absolutely hammers all of a workstation’s CPU cores. It is also extremely scalable, so doubling the number of cores can, in many cases, halve the render time.

Most CAD software is very different in that it is a single-threaded process, so the majority of tasks are performed on one CPU core. This means it thrives on a high-frequency (GHz) CPU. Performance will not increase if you add more CPU cores.

This presents a big challenge when choosing a workstation for both CAD and rendering. The highest frequency CPUs have the least number of cores, while the ones with the most cores tend to have the lowest frequencies.

As a result, architects and engineers must accept that there will always be a trade-off — or must they?

Custom workstation manufacturer BOXX offers an alternative solution by dedicating separate machines to each process. CAD work is done on the BOXX APEXX 2, a high-frequency Intel Core i7 desktop workstation, while the rendering is handled by the BOXX renderPRO 2, a networked, dual Intel Xeon rendering machine with lots of cores.

As both machines work completely independently of each other, it also means that the BOXX APEXX 2 workstation is able to dedicate almost all of its resources to CAD modelling when the BOXX renderPRO 2 is rendering.

In contrast, when a traditional desktop workstation is set to render flat out, it will often become sluggish, making it almost impossible to do any meaningful CAD work.

There are ways to get around this. Users can reduce the number of cores assigned to the rendering task, either by changing processor affinity in Windows Task manager (so specific applications use specific CPU cores) or by applying more granular control of CPU core usage inside the rendering application. But that means renders come back slower. Continue reading